With “The [R]evolution of Hip Hop Breakbeat Narratives” — the centerpiece exhibit installed for the forthcoming Universal Hip Hop Museum — an MIT team uses artificial intelligence to explore the rich history of Hip Hop music.

A new museum is coming to New York City in 2023, the year of Hip Hop’s 50th birthday, and an MIT team has helped to pave the way for the city to celebrate the legacy of this important musical genre — by designing unique creative experiences at the intersection of art, learning, and contemporary technology.

With “The [R]evolution of Hip Hop Breakbeat Narratives,” a team led by D. Fox Harrell, professor of digital media and artificial intelligence and director of the MIT Center for Advanced Virtuality, has created an art installation that takes museum-goers on an interactive, personalized journey through Hip Hop history.

The installation served as the centerpiece of an event held this month by leaders of the highly anticipated Universal Hip Hop Museum (UHHM), which will officially open in just a few years in the Bronx — the future home of the UHHM, and where many agree that the genre of Hip Hop music originated.

“Hip Hop is much more than a musical genre. It is a global phenomenon, with a rich history and massive social and cultural impact, with local roots in the Bronx,” Harrell says. “As an educational center, the Universal Hip Hop Museum will have the power to connect people to the surrounding community.”

Harrell’s immersive art installation takes museum-goers on a journey through Hip Hop culture and history, from the 1970s to the present. However, not everyone experiences the installation in the same way. Using a computational model of users’ preferences and artificial intelligence technologies to drive interaction, the team of artists and computer scientists from the Center for Advanced Virtuality has created layered, personalized virtual experiences.

When approaching the exhibit, museum-goers are greeted by “The Elementals,” or novel characters named after the five elements of Hip Hop (MC, DJ, Breakdance, Graffiti Art, and Knowledge) that guide users and ask key questions — “What is your favorite hip hop song?” or “Which from this pair of lyrics do you like the most?” Based on those answers, the Elementals take users through their own personalized narrative of Hip Hop history.

Harrell developed the Elementals with professors John Jennings of the University of California at Riverside and Stacey Robinson of the University of Illinois — artists collectively known as Black Kirby. This visual aesthetic ties the work into the rich, imaginative cultures and iconography of the African diaspora.

Through these conversations with the Elementals they encounter, people can explore broad social issues surrounding Hip Hop, such as gender, fashion, and location. At the end of their journey, they can take home a personalized playlist of songs.

“We designed the Breakbeat Narratives installation by integrating Microsoft conversational AI technologies, which made our user modeling more personable, with a music visualization platform from the TunesMap Educational Foundation,” Harrell says.

The exploration of social issues is about as close to the heart of Harrell’s mission in the Center for Advanced Virtuality as one can get. In the center, Harrell designs virtual technologies to stimulate creative expression, cultural analysis, and positive social change.

“We wanted to tell stories that pushed beyond stereotypical representations, digging into the complexities of both empowering and problematic representations that often coexist,” he says. “This work fits into our endeavor called the Narrative, Orality, and Improvisation Research (NOIR) Initiative that uses AI technologies to forward the art forms of diverse global cultures.”

Through this art project enabled by contemporary technologies, Harrell hopes that he has helped museum leadership to achieve their goal of celebrating Hip Hop’s heritage and legacy.

“Now, people internationally can have a stake in this great art.”

Suzanne Day

About Suzanne Day

8 Comments

  • Great content! Super high-quality! Keep it up! 🙂

  • Thank you for the sensible critique. Me & my neighbor were just preparing to do a little research about this. We got a grab a book from our local library but I think I learned more from this post. I’m very glad to see such fantastic information being shared freely out there.

  • Socjologia Blog says:

    You got a really useful blog I have been here reading for about an hour. I am a newbie and your success is very much an inspiration for me.

  • Delta 8 says:

    I really enjoy the blog.Much thanks again. Awesome.

  • zortilonrel says:

    I don’t even know how I ended up here, but I thought this post was great. I do not know who you are but definitely you’re going to a famous blogger if you aren’t already 😉 Cheers!

  • Genetyka says:

    Please tell me that youre going to keep this up! Its so great and so important. I cant wait to read more from you. I just really feel like you know so substantially and know how to make people listen to what youve to say. This blog is just also cool to be missed. Excellent stuff, seriously. Please, PLEASE keep it up!

  • This is my 1st time Ive visited this site. I identified a whole lot of interesting info within your blog. From the volume of comments on your posts, I guess I am not the only 1! maintain up the impressive work.

  • Umowa NAFTA says:

    This is a attention-grabbing article by the way. I am going to go ahead and save this article for my brother to read later on tomorrow. Keep up the high-quality work.

Leave a Reply